scala

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curious case of putting override modifier when overriding an abstract method in Scala

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This is a translation of Scalaで抽象メソッドをoverrideする際にoverride修飾子を付けるべきかどうかの是非 by Kenji Yoshida (@xuwei_k), a Scalaz committer.

First, a quote from Programming in Scala, 2nd ed. p. 192:

Scala requires [override] modifier for all members that override a concrete member in a parent class. The modifier is optional if a member implements an abstract member with the same name.

In this post, we'll discuss this "The modififier is optional." Since overriding an existing method with implementation requires override modifier, and failure to do so would result to a compiler error, there's not much to talk about for that case. We'll focus on whether one should put override modifier or not in the case of overring an abtract method. I don't think there's going to be any difference in Scala version, but let's assume the latest stable 2.10.3.

Scala: the flying sandwich parts

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JavaScript existed since 1995 long before 'JavaScript: The Good Parts' (2008), jQuery (2006), and V8 (2008) happened. The interesting thing about Douglas Crockford's 'The Good Parts' is that unlike the other additive work, it's a book about subtracting features from the language.

I've been thinking about exploring a subset of Scala in a wonderland setting without the "real world" constraints such as Java familiarity and interoperability. If using Scala as an alternative Java is acceptable, why not try using it as an alternative functional programming language? Another point of this thought experiment is to see some of the duplicate constructs can be reduced. In this article, I'm not interested in finding out the idiomatic way, or calling something good or bad. I'm calling this The Flying Sandwich Parts (TFSP).

scopt 3.0

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scopt is a little command line options parsing library.

Today, I'm releasing scopt 3.0. If you're not interested in the implementation details, skip to the readme.

Around March 4th, 2010, I became a committer to scopt, a fork of Aaron Harnly's scala-options that was written in 2008. I think I wanted to make a few changes around the usage text, key=value options, and argument list. Since then I've been fielding all the bug reports, including the request to publish the jar on scala-tools.org. On March 18, 2012, I forked the project again to scopt/scopt and released scopt 2.0.0 that added immutable parser.

After years of adding features on top of the other, I decided to rewrite scopt3 from scratch. The tipping point was Leif Wickland asking if there's a "philosophical reason that scopt doesn't have an intArg().".

how to write a Dispatch plugin

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Dispatch has been the de facto library to get to the Internet from Scala. To keep in step with the recent move towards non-blocking IO, @n8han rewrote the library as Reboot based on Async Http Client. This became Dispatch 0.9. Then Dispatch 0.10 came out to replace its own Promise type with the standarized SIP-14 Future.

As with Dispatch Classic, Reboot lets you write plugins to wrap around web APIs. In this post we'll port a plugin from Classic to explore how it works.

working on your own twitter bot?

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